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Thanks to Marik Berghs for a Great Review

I am so thrilled over the latest review!   :party: :party: :party: :party: :party:
Bibbity Bobbety New, September 28, 2012 By Marik Berghs “still crazy after all these years” (San Francisco Bay Area) – See all my reviews (REAL NAME)
This review is from: Maven Fairy Godmother: Through the Veil (Kindle Edition)

Maven Fairy Godmother: Through the Veil by Charlotte Henley Babb.

I’m a fairy tale junkie and Maven Fairy Godmother is a winner for anyone who believes that every story should have a happy ending. Modern stories demand more of their happy endings. Princesses aren’t asking to be saved. They would rather save themselves.

Fairy Godmother Superior realizes that Fairy is dying. She’s got to recruit some new Fairy Godmothers or hundreds of years of work goes down the tubes. Neither of her two choices would be her first choices, or even her last, but she’s desperate.
Maven is an educated, unemployed woman in her fifties who is down on her luck and out of options. She responds to a call about a mysterious job interview. She is hired and wakes up in Fairy enlisted in Fairy Godmother boot camp. The first strike against her is that she is human, a mundane, someone from the other side of the veil. The Fairy Godmother Superior doesn’t seem to like her much and really doesn’t like the way Maven’s modern outlooks are introducing dangerously unorthodox ideas through the land.

Maven’s side-kick is even less viable as a candidate for Fairy Godmother status. Young and beautiful, Daisy is torn between her desire to save Fairy and to live in the Mundane, a place she dreams of often but has never visited. Enter a computer wizard, dragons, princes, wolves, helpless maidens, selfish maidens, dissatisfied maidens, with many offers of unrequited love. The story is rich with subplots, allegory, metaphors and literary allusions.

Maven Fairy Godmother is clever, witty, engaging. Unlike traditional fairy tales where the characters are flat archetypes we learn nothing about as individuals, Ms Babbs characters pull you in, developing round unforgettable personalities. Ms. Babb deftly weaves folklore, metaphor and human psychology into intriguing new fairy tales. She intertwines the basic rules of magic into an elegant, stylistically repeating admonition: be careful what you wish for.

I really enjoyed this read and it stayed with me for days. I was given a copy for review but was under no obligation to finish the book or review it. The opinions offered are strictly my own.

The Telling of Shoes by C.W. Ingram

The Telling of Shoes by C.W. IngramThis dark fairy tale, in every sense of the words dark, fairy, and tale, is just too dark for me. The character development is engrossing as the stories of the past and present intertwine from the point of view of the woman who would be the fairy godmother of of a princess and a shoemaker. While there is a bit of Cinderella here, it’s written in blood with an obscenely expensive stiletto heel.

Set in the gritty world of “bespoke” shoes and designer fashion, the stories of three women are braided like a horsewhip of betrayal, violence and rape. The ending goes where it must, but I did not feel that the central character achieved her redemption or release, but only added another layer to the midden of her life.  I was glad when it was over. But the writing is so good, I had to read to the end, always hoping for some spark of light and release that did not appear.

With a size 11WW foot, the idea of being able to commission a shoe of say, elephant hide, that would actually fit my foot, and to be able to walk in it, is beyond fairy tale fantasy for me.  But even if I had the means to live in that world, I can’t imagine being only an assemblage of retail receipts, and not a person in my own right. That is exactly where the main character is, though she wears vintage Chanel.

The Telling of Shoes is well-told, and the writing unwavering. If you like that sort of thing, you will pulled into this maelstrom for a ride you won’t soon forget, no matter how hard you try.

Review: Curses! a F***ed Up Fairy Tale

J. A. Kazimer’s Curses! a F***ed Up Fairy Tale is fun in a Dr. Demento style. This Sam-Spade-meets-Snidely-Whiplash mash-up has more twists than a garter snake on a hot tin roof. It gets more than a little silly at times, but it’s entertaining and clever.

When Princess Cinderella is run over by a pumpkin carriage, everyone thinks it’s an accident except one disenchanted villain who has lost his magic and has the hots for Cinderella’s sister. That princess has a curse of her own to break, and its threads spin through the story, strangling witnesses before they can spill the beans.

The main character RJ’s recent demotion from villain to everyman causes him more than a little grief.  RJ can’t use his usual magic, and can hardly even say a curse word. The twists are clever as RJ does his villainous best to capture the heart of the woman he loves, even after she tries to kill him.

I did get a bit tired of the constant snark, but every fairy tale you can imagine (or at least the old movie version onTV )  is folded, bent, spindled and mutilated by the typical private detective plot, with explosions. It’s available on kindle, but I read the dead-tree edition.

Thank you, Whoopdeyoo! for a Sweet Review

A review fromWhoopdeyoo! :D
http://whoopeeyoo.com/2012/08/21/book-blog-tour-maven-fairy-godmother-review/ :

Oh my, I liked it! I loved fairytales as a kid but what I found out was that I love fractured fairytales even more. Heroines gone kickass, no more damsels in distress. Prince Charmings who are not one-dimensional. Maybe that’s why I freaking love the show Once Upon a Time. You get fractured fairytales every episode. And Charlotte Henley Babb writes fractured fairytales! Sure, this isn’t really a specific fairytale revisioned for my enjoyment but it is about a middle-aged fairy godmother. Well, she wasn’t a fairy godmother at first but she was offered the job. I never knew being a fairy godmother is a job you can get. Hahaha! I love the concept! I’m a generally happy person and so happy endings always have a place in me even though they’re oftentimes cliche and very formulaic. What a job it is to be the one responsible for handing out happy endings and happy everafters? Squee! Of course, it isn’t always rainbows being a fairy godmother because it can be dangerous and it can place you in trouble. But life is all the more fun with that!

So this book is so fun and relatable and just plain good! It’s exciting and a fast read. Perfect for a lazy reading and for deriving happiness from a book. :)

Request for Reviews

Please feel free to review “Maven Fairy Godmother – Through the Veil” on askDavid.com, on Amazon.com,  or at Barnes & Noble.  If you have a blog and like to review fantasy, leave a comment to see how you can get a review copy. Maven is also available on iTunes. Grab a copy, sit back, and prepare to smile.

Fairy godmother images

Just some fairy godmother images I likedSmiley Godmother

Fairy Godmother on Coffee
Every fairy godmother has her favorite stimulant–looks like this one drank some of Maven’s coffee.
Betty Boop Mother
I don’t quite get Betty Boop, but someone clearly does, in sparkly purple.
Damoiselle Dragonfly's Fairy Godmother
Damoiselle Dragonfly’s Fairy Godmother – This one looks more like Black Arlet.
Fiona Silverthorne, Fairy Godmother Superior
Fiona Silverthorne, Fairy Godmother Superior, on a good day

Review: The Mall Fairies: Exile

In The Mall Fairies: Exile, Conda V. Douglas explores the efforts of two teens, a fairy named Swoop and a human named Grace, as they scheme to get what they want despite the rules and the adults.

I was impressed by the realism of the fairy society and the downsides of their living in the mall, stealing crumbs from the food court and doll items from other stores–much like the Borrowers, except that most of them can fly. The book hints at their previous history, raising questions to be explored in series.

Like many first-in-the-series novels, this one explores the structure and hierarchy of the fairy world, following  Swoop and her friends as they learn why the rules are in place. Both girls make unfortunate choices, and the repercussions  make their original goals seem childish.

Written for tweens, this is an excellent coming of age story unfolding across the edges of two worlds. It is complex and developed enough for adult readers. I enjoyed reading it.

I received a free copy for review. Conda V. Douglas is also published with Muse It Up.

Faery and the Veil

Where is Faery?

The realm of  Faery is the remains of myth and folktale at the beginning of the printing era–a division from the written word, the space between the reality of a story, the telling of a story and the capturing of a story, like a lightning bug in a mason jar,  to pin it down to one frozen form, and from there to deconstruct  it to make derivations.

The Veil is a spell that was constructed around the edges of Faery to keep outside its borders those who would kill and eliminate the Fae. It also separates the dimension of the shaman, the HyperDimension (HD), where many people have lost a soul  through substance abuse without the shaman’s training. The Veil was concocted by all the fae who could see the value of protection and who wanted to live in a certain amount of peace in their long lives.

As the Veil and the spell that sustains it unravel, more and more of the denizens of Fiction, the HyperDimension, Cyberspace, and even Mundane will be coming to call.  The Twilight Lounge may become very crowded, especially if Belle is not there to ride herd on the cats that hang out there. The Twilight Lounge is not properly part of Faery or any of the other dimensions, but is a portal, a nexxus for moving from one to the other, and possibly other destinations.

The Fae occasionally brought someone across, or went slumming themselves, but for the most part, the Veil between Mundane, HD and Faery was solid and useful. Some of the Fae stayed too long in Mundane, and died, but others found a way to live here permanently, in a pocket world called Mundance–a muse-ical typo that has happened enough times to make it come true. From my perspective, the entire urban fantasy genre comes from Mundance–bits of Faery encapsulated in the fossilized amber of Mundane. What happens if the Veil completely unravels, as it has in Neauwae, remains to be seen.

Over the last 1000 years (at least in Mundane), a new dimension has grown at right angles both from Faery and from Mundane, often called Cyberspace in these modern times, but it did not originate in telecommunications. Cyberspace is not only the space between my keyboard and your monitor, but between my mouth and your ears over the phone, and between my mind and your mind as you live in the world that I create.

This is only possible because you and I are ONE.  That which expresses as me and that which expresses as you are connected to each other as the ONE, so that images and sensations from my pre-frontal cortex can be coded onto symbols and decoded by your prefrontal cortex. This is the deepest magic, that one person can make up a story, and another can experience it.

At some point, Maven will be exploring this dimension, maybe running into some of her favorite characters from literature, TV and movies. She might also meet both gamers and game characters–wonder if Lara Croft or Zelda have any wishes to be granted?

Why Every Little Girl Should Stay A Princess By Stacy Green

As I’m writing this, I’m watching my precocious and brilliant (I’m only slightly biased) six-year-old dance around in her bathing suit, pretending to be a model. What happened to being a princess? I try to keep her away from the shows with the scantily clad girls, but lets face it: they’re everywhere, and even the little girls have an understanding of what society deems “sexy.”

Scares me to death. She’s growing up so quickly, and I want her to stay my little baby. And I certainly don’t want her to think her self-worth and popularity rests on her figure or the way she dresses. But I can’t protect her from friends with older siblings, or the things she’s learning from kids at school.

Soon enough, she’ll hit puberty. And she’s going to be just like me. She’s already an emotional basket case with a stubborn streak that rivals my own. You can imagine the arguments. I’m terrified of her teenage years. My mind is filled the things every parent fears: what if she falls in with the wrong crowd? What if she stops speaking to me? What if she does poorly in school? What if a boy ruins her teenage life? Will I be able to help her? There’s no rulebook for this sort of thing, and I never was much for those, anyway.

All I can do is love her, be there for her. Just like my mother was for me. She was and is my best friend, and because of her support, I stayed a princess longer than a lot of my little girlfriends. I might have been a little naïve, but I was happy with my dolls and pretend classroom, and I was spared a couple of years of angst.

It probably won’t happen, but I pray for the same for Grace. I want her to be a princess a little while longer, before clothes and shoes and popularity become everything.

Stacy Green
Stacy Green, author of INTO THE DARK

Raised in southeastern Iowa, Stacy Green cultivated her love of suspense and thrillers watching crime shows with her parents. She’s fascinated by the workings of the criminal mind and explores true crime on her popular Thriller Thursday posts.

Her debut romantic suspense novel is set in Las Vegas and features a heroine on the edge of disaster, a tormented villain, and the city’s infamous storm drains that house hundreds of homeless.

INTO THE DARK releases from MuseItUp Publishing November 30.

Catch up with Stacy online: Twitter Facebook Blog

The Veil

The Veil is a spell that was constructed to keep out those who would kill and eliminate the fae outside its borders, and to repel those who fell outside of Mundane reality through a pill or a bottle or a smoke with no training and guidance on their own side.  It was concocted by all the fae who could see the value of protection and who wanted to live in a certain amount of peace in their long lives.

As the Veil and the spell that sustains it unravel, more and more of the denizens of Fiction, the HyperDimension, Cyberspace, and even Mundane will be coming to call.  The Twilight Lounge may become very crowded, especially if Belle is not there to ride herd on the cats that hang out there. The Twilight Lounge is not properly part of Faery or any of the other dimensions, but is a portal, a nexxus for moving from one to the other, and possibly other destinations.

The Fae occasionally brought someone across, or went slumming themselves, but for the most part, the Veil between Mundane, HD and Faery was solid and useful. Some of the Fae stayed too long in Mundane, and died, but others found a way to live here permanently, in a pocket world called Mundance–a muse-ical typo that has happened enough times to make it come true. From my perspective, all the urban fantasy genre comes from Mundance–a little bit of Faery encapsulated in the fossilized amber of Mundane. What happens if the Veil completely unravels  remains to be seen.